>Peckerwood Twist by Nathan Lichtwar

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As I mentioned in a previous review, I always read the back of every book even if I know what the book is about.  It’s usually pretty obvious considering which section of the bookstore it’s in (fantasy, science fiction, youth 9-12, etc.) and the title.  Well this particular book, Peckerwood Twist, was sent to me by the author (thank you by the way) and I didn’t quite know what to expect.  I remember the author contacting me earlier and telling me what the book was about and asking me if I’d like to review it.  I also remember thinking it sounded interesting and wanted to read it.

Well that was a while ago (not really, maybe a few weeks), but I was in the middle of other books so I couldn’t get to it at the time (remember I read slooooooooooow).  Anyways so I finally got around to reading it, but I could not remember what it was about.  As per habit, I turn the book over and read the back.  I didn’t realize it at the time, but it was the opening paragraph of the book.  I thought it was the synopsis of the book and it talked about heat and how it seems to have a life of its own sometimes.  I feel embarrassed admitting it now, but I took the back of the book literally and thought Peckerwood Twist would be some kind of science fiction book about heat.  Then I continued reading the back, the part about the author, and then it occurred to me what the book would be about.  Definitely not some evil being known as heat lol.

Anyways the book is about a man and a women who seek out adventure in the Amazon.  Well I guess seek out isn’t the most accurate description – more like adventure finds them.  They end up searching for gold, running from drug dealers, meeting ghosts, and other crazy stuff – least of which being the man and woman are complete strangers who agree to travel together.

To be honest, I am currently on page 84 out of 206 and I don’t feel like continuing on.  You know how when some people give ridiculous accounts of events such as why they didn’t do their homework, the listening party starts thinking “it’s so ridiculous it might just be true”?  Well up to this point the story has been ridiculously unbelievable that it just might be true.

Considering the book is called Peckerwood Twist, I am really trying to resist the urge to find out just what this twist is.   Well I suppose I should mention that in this book, one of the main characters is re-telling the story to someone in a bar which adds to my suspicion that there is a twist coming.

Ok well it was obvious the woman, Ursula, wasn’t who she pretended to be.  Finally on page 90 and on she reveals who she is and why she sought out Sam, the male protagonist.  Also explains why the story kept jumping from one thing to another.  Turns out it has something to do with the German concentration camps in World War II and about some experiments they were doing to twins.  I’m a sucker for psychology, so I am finally getting interested.  Oh yeah, and the names Carl, Sigmund, and Jung were not lost on me.  Meanwhile we are told Sam looks identical to the antagonist of the book which makes the reader wonder……

There was one particular line in the book that secretly put a smile on my lips – a line about how the protagonist could write a best selling book after his adventures.

Travelling and sight seeing are very low on my to do list, so a book that has many details about certain foreign places doesn’t appeal to me as much as it would for someone else.  It’s clear the author has many exciting stories to tell, but in this book that was a problem.  The book is only 206 pages long, so there just wasn’t enough time to develop all those stories and plot lines.  I would have appreciated the author just stick to one story line and follow it through.  To make matters worse (or perhaps better), spies and counter spies run rampant in the book so everything kind of just meshes together.

Well all in all I had fun reading.  Peckerwood Twist does exactly what a book is meant to do – entertain.  Thank you again Captain Nathan Lichtwar for sending me this book to read.

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One Response to >Peckerwood Twist by Nathan Lichtwar

  1. >Oh, this book sounds interesting. The Nazi twin studies would put a strange creepy twist in any book.

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